Speakers

SUDHA SESHADRI

Co-organizer, Boston University

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Dr. Sudha Seshadri, MD, is a Professor of Neurology at the Boston University School of Medicine and a Senior Investigator at the Framingham Heart Study. She is recognized as a leading expert in risk factor and genomic epidemiologic studies of stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and brain aging including MRI and cognitive endophenotypes. She receives substantial research grant support from the National Institutes of Health as Principal investigator on multiple R01s and is a key investigator at the Framingham Heart Study and in several international genetic collaborations. She leads the Neurology Phenotype Working Group within the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, is a Principal Investigator on the Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project and serves as Vice-Chair of the METASTROKE consortium. She is board-certified neurologist with a clinical practice covering general neurology and dementia, teaches a 3-week introductory Neurology course to medical students and mentors post-doctoral fellows and junior-faculty from several countries including the United States, Canada, Israel, France and Australia. Dr. Seshadri has been invited to participate as a Plenary Speaker and expert at several national and international symposia. She serves on the editorial boards of the journals Neurology, Stroke and Journal of Alzheimer Disease and also Chairs the NIH NAME (Neurological, Aging and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology) Study Section in addition to serving as a reviewer for numerous international funding agencies.

STÉPHANIE DEBETTE

Co-organizer, Bordeaux University

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Stéphanie Debette is Professor of epidemiology and neurology at Bordeaux University and INSERM U1219 (where she directs a team of vascular and neurological diseases: integrative and genetic epidemiology: http://www.bordeaux-population-health.center/en/teams/vascular-and-neurological-diseases-integrative-and-genetic-epidemiology-vintage/), and adjunct associate professor in the department of neurology, Boston University, USA. S. Debette is a practicing neurologist since 2006 and holds a master degree in statistical genetics and a PhD in Epidemiology (2008). She obtained a Fulbright fellowship, a Chair of Excellence (French National Research Agency), and is member of a Leducq Transatlantic Network of Excellence on cerebral small vessel disease. Recently she received a European Research Council starting grant to study genetic determinants of early structural brain alterations in young students. She is actively involved in the Cohorts of Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, current vice-chair of the International Stroke Genetics Consortium (ISGC) steering committee, and coordinates the CADISP (Cervical Artery Dissection and Ischemic Stroke in young Patients) consortium.

PHILIP DE JAGER

Co-organizer, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard School of Medicine

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Dr. Philip De Jager is an Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Program in Translational NeuroPsychiatric Genomics within the Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry. He is the first incumbent of the Steven R. and Kathleen P. Haley Distinguished Chair for the Neurosciences at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

After completing Yale University with a degree in Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry as well as French literature, Dr. De Jager received a Ph.D. in Neurogenetics from Rockefeller University and an M.D. from Cornell University Medical College before completing his M.M.Sc. in Clinical Investigation at Harvard Medical School and MIT. He has previously served as a Clinical Fellow in Neurology at BWH and MGH, and is currently a practicing neurologist at the Multiple Sclerosis Center at BWH.

The goal of Dr. De Jager’s work as a clinician-scientist is to apply modern methods of neuroimmunology, statistical genetics and systems biology to the understanding of common neurodegenerative diseases. He has applied his discoveries from basic research to develop novel tools to enhance clinical decision-making, identify new therapeutic targets and test lead compounds to perturb the sequence of events leading from health to neurodegenerative diseases.

Dr. De Jager studies primarily multiple sclerosis (MS) and age-related cognitive decline. In both of these neurodegenerataive diseases, he is identifying molecular networks that contribute to pathophysiology and, thanks to support from a $7.9 million grant from the NIH’s Accelerating Medicines Partnership, he has built an analytic and experimental pipeline to validate target genes and discover new lead compounds in human neurons, astrocytes, macrophage and microglial cells.

CHRISTOPHE TZOURIO

Co-organizer, Bordeaux University

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Christophe Tzourio is Professor of epidemiology at Bordeaux University and director of the Bordeaux Population Health Research Center UMR Inserm 1219. Dr. Tzourio is especially interested in studying the consequences of blood pressure on the brain and particularly through the study of MRI small-vessels related brain lesions. He co-authored >280 peer-reviewed articles and is ranked among the top 1% of highly cited scientists by the ISI Web of Science. Dr. Tzourio is currently PI of the 3C study, a population based cohort study in >9000 elderly individuals which aims at evaluating the importance of vascular factors in dementia. He is also PI of the i- Share study, an ongoing large student cohort aiming at studying students’ health as well as early determinants of common diseases occurring later in life. 

BRADFORD B WORRALL

University of Virginia, Charlottesville

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Bradford B Worrall is a Professor of Neurology and Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia and director of the Vascular Neurology Fellowship there. He has been active in numerous stoke genetics trials over the past 15 years including the Ischaemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS), the Siblings with Ischaemic Stroke Study (SWISS), the Genetics of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Anticoagulation (GOCHA) study and the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) study. He co-PI'd a U-01 funded GWAS of treatement response grant with Michele Sale using the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) trial. The overall project is known as the Genome-wide Association Research Network into Effects of Treatment (GARNET) and includes a wide range of randomised clinical trials in many disease types. He is a founding member of the International Stroke Genetics Consortium and runs a translational stroke genetics laboratory at the University of Virginia. Dr. Worrall is a co-Principal investigator  of the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) which funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and co-chairs the Phenotype Harmonization committee. Dr. Worrall is an Associate Editor for the journal Neurology where he handles the cerebrovascular disease, neurocritical care, and education portfolios.

DONNA CHEN

University of Virginia, Charlottesville

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Donna Chen is Associate Professor in the Center for Biomedical Ethics, Department of Public Health Sciences, and Department of Psychiatry & Neurobehavioral Sciences at the University of Virginia School of Medicine.  Dr. Chen’s scholarly work addresses questions in clinical and research ethics, largely related to the clinical neurosciences; professional and organizational ethics; and ethics education.  An award-winning educator, she teaches ethics across the University setting to students in undergraduate, graduate, medical, law, public health and nursing programs and to research trainees and faculty at all levels aiming always to instill an appreciation for asking good questions and seeking answers that are practical, relevant, and honor important ethical values. Her ethics research aims to advance knowledge through conceptual analyses and empirical research, which in turn helps guide developments in ethics practices, policies, and normative understandings. Dr. Chen has consulted to researchers and policy-makers at institutions in the US and abroad and served on committees related to clinical and research ethics, including for the National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, National Institute for Drug Abuse, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine, and the American Psychiatric Association. As a physician-researcher whose work in ethics connects theoretical concepts and empirical research to improve policy and practice, Dr. Chen sees her scholarly contributions as a form of “translational research” in bioethics. 

PAUL THOMPSON

University of South California, Los Angeles

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Paul Thompson directs the USC Imaging Genetics Center and serves as Associate Director of the new Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics at the University of Southern California. At USC, he is a Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Engineering, and Ophthalmology and serves as Associate Dean for Research at the Keck USC School of Medicine. He co-founded and leads the Enhancing Neuro Imaging Genetics Through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) consortium, a worldwide medical network of 125 institutions studying the major diseases of the brain. ENIGMA discovers factors that affect the progression on Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, schizophrenia, depression and bipolar illness, HIV/AIDS, methamphetamine abuse, autism, and childhood brain disorders. One study unites teams from the Thai Red Cross, the US, and South Africa to study how treatments restore brain growth in HIV-infected children. His group also created the first maps of Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia in the living brain, and a method to detect brain growth in children . Thompson obtained his M.A. in Mathematics and Classical Languages from Oxford University, England, and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from UCLA.

ANITA DESTEFANO

Boston University

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Anita L. DeStefano, Ph.D. is Professor of Biostatistics and Neurology, and Associate Director of the BUMC Genome Science Institute. She served for 10 years as Co-Director of the Biostatistics Graduate Program and is current Director of the Graduate Certificate Program in Statistical Genetics. Dr. DeStefano developed a course in Statistical Genetics (BS858), which is taught to MPH, Biostatistics Program, and other graduate students. She is also an instructor and co-PI of the BU Summer Institute for Research Education in Biostatistics program.  Her main research interest is statistical genetics. She was an investigator in the multi-national GenePD study working to identify the genes contributing Parkinson Disease. Dr. DeStefano is also a senior statistical geneticist for the Framingham Heart Study focusing on stroke, Alzheimer disease and related endophenotypes including brain MRI measures. She is a key member of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium Neurology working group and of the International Genomics of Alzheimer Disease (IGAP) consortium. She is currently co-leading QC efforts and is active in analyses in the joint NHGRI/NIA Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project. She is PI of a study that is examining gene expression measures from RNA and microRNA sequencing in post-mortem brain tissue from multiple brain regions in relationship to lifetime obesity status.

LENORE J LAUNER

National Institutes of Aging, Bethesda

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After receiving her PhD in epidemiology from Cornell University and completed her post-doctoral studies at the National Institutes of Health in the U.S. In 1990, Dr. Launer moved to the Netherlands, where she held coordinated European Dementia initiatives and research on migraine. In 1999 she joined the National Institute on Aging, US to lead the Neuroepidemiology Section of the Intramural Research Program. Studies in the Neuroepidemiology Section focus on understanding the contribution of genetic, inflammatory, metabolic, vascular, and hormonal factors to well characterized continuously and discretely measured sub-clinical and clinical phenotypes in brain disease and investigating the links between brain disease and other common diseases of old age. Research is conducted using large epidemiologic studies, including the HAAS, GES-Reykjavik Study, and CARDIA, which allow testing in the general population, hypotheses on risk/protective factors and mechanisms identified in experimental and clinical studies. Dr. Launer has developed research resources to investigate the association of these physiologic measures to brain structure and function at different periods in life, and at different stages of the disease processes leading to dementia. 

ZDENKA PAUSOVA

Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, and Toronto University

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Dr. Pausova obtained her MD degree from Purkyně University (Czech Republic) in 1986. She then received research training in Genetics at McGill University and the University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada (1990-1998). Currently, Dr. Pausova is Senior Scientist in the Hospital for Sick Children and Professor in the Departments of Physiology and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, Canada. Her research focuses on the causes and health consequences of adolescent and adult obesity. She co-directs the Saguenay Youth Study aimed at investigating cardiometabolic and brain health, and its genetic and epigenetic modifiers, in 2,000 Canadian adolescents and their parents (http://www.saguenay-youth-study.org). She has published 139 peer-reviewed papers and 4 book chapters. She has received the Award for Excellence in Research from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and is an elected Fellow of the American Heart Association.

Main Research Projects

  • Obesity as a risk factor of cardiometabolic and brain disease

  • Eating behavior, addiction and brain-structure correlates

  • Genetic and environmental factors modulating DNA methylation in health and disease

 

Research Methodology

  • Cardiometabolic Physiology

  • Nutrition

  • Lipidomics

  • Epidemiology

  • Population Genetics and Epigenetics

TOMAS PAUS

University of Toronto

Dr. Paus is the Tanenbaum Chair in Population Neuroscience at Baycrest, Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Toronto, and the Dr. John and Consuela Phelan Scholar at Child Mind Institute in New York. His work integrates epidemiology, neuroscience and genetics – through a new discipline of population neuroscience - in the pursuit of knowledge relevant for child and youth mental health.

The work published by Dr. Paus and his colleagues have been well received by peers, being cited in over 30,000 publications. In 2013, Springer published his book “Population Neuroscience”. Dr. Paus received the Royal Society Wolfson Merit Award, Gold Medal of the Masaryk University, is an elected member of the International Neuropsychology Symposium and an elected fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, serves as Associate Editor of the Human Brain Mapping and Social Neuroscience, and as a member of several Scientific Advisory Boards in Europe and North America.

Distinguished list of speakers

with over 20+

faculty speakers 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Bradford B Worrall is a Professor of Neurology and Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia and director of the Vascular Neurology Fellowship there. He has been active in numerous stoke genetics trials over the past 15 years including the Ischaemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS), the Siblings with Ischaemic Stroke Study (SWISS), the Genetics of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Anticoagulation (GOCHA) study and the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) study. He co-PI'd a U-01 funded GWAS of treatement response grant with Michele Sale using the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) trial. The overall project is known as the Genome-wide Association Research Network into Effects of Treatment (GARNET) and includes a wide range of randomised clinical trials in many disease types. He is a founding member of the International Stroke Genetics Consortium and runs a translational stroke genetics laboratory at the University of Virginia. Dr. Worrall is a co-Principal investigator  of the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) which funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and co-chairs the Phenotype Harmonization committee. Dr. Worrall is an Associate Editor for the journal Neurology where he handles the cerebrovascular disease, neurocritical care, and education portfolios.

DONNA CHEN

University of Virginia, Charlottesville

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LENORE J LAUNER

National Institutes of Aging, Bethesda

ZDENKA PAUSOVA

Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, and Toronto University

Dr. Pausova obtained her MD degree from Purkyně University (Czech Republic) in 1986. She then received research training in Genetics at McGill University and the University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada (1990-1998). Currently, Dr. Pausova is Senior Scientist in the Hospital for Sick Children and Professor in the Departments of Physiology and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, Canada. Her research focuses on the causes and health consequences of adolescent and adult obesity. She co-directs the Saguenay Youth Study aimed at investigating cardiometabolic and brain health, and its genetic and epigenetic modifiers, in 2,000 Canadian adolescents and their parents (http://www.saguenay-youth-study.org). She has published 139 peer-reviewed papers and 4 book chapters. She has received the Award for Excellence in Research from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and is an elected Fellow of the American Heart Association.

Main Research Projects

  • Obesity as a risk factor of cardiometabolic and brain disease

  • Eating behavior, addiction and brain-structure correlates

  • Genetic and environmental factors modulating DNA methylation in health and disease

 

Research Methodology

  • Cardiometabolic Physiology

  • Nutrition

  • Lipidomics

  • Epidemiology

  • Population Genetics and Epigenetics

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SUDHA SESHADRI

Co-organizer, Boston University

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Dr. Sudha Seshadri, MD, is a Professor of Neurology at the Boston University School of Medicine and a Senior Investigator at the Framingham Heart Study. She is recognized as a leading expert in risk factor and genomic epidemiologic studies of stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and brain aging including MRI and cognitive endophenotypes. She receives substantial research grant support from the National Institutes of Health as Principal investigator on multiple R01s and is a key investigator at the Framingham Heart Study and in several international genetic collaborations. She leads the Neurology Phenotype Working Group within the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, is a Principal Investigator on the Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project and serves as Vice-Chair of the METASTROKE consortium. She is board-certified neurologist with a clinical practice covering general neurology and dementia, teaches a 3-week introductory Neurology course to medical students and mentors post-doctoral fellows and junior-faculty from several countries including the United States, Canada, Israel, France and Australia. Dr. Seshadri has been invited to participate as a Plenary Speaker and expert at several national and international symposia. She serves on the editorial boards of the journals Neurology, Stroke and Journal of Alzheimer Disease and also Chairs the NIH NAME (Neurological, Aging and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology) Study Section in addition to serving as a reviewer for numerous international funding agencies.

STÉPHANIE DEBETTE

Co-organizer, Bordeaux University

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Stéphanie Debette is Professor of epidemiology and neurology at Bordeaux University and INSERM U1219 (where she directs a team of vascular and neurological diseases: integrative and genetic epidemiology: http://www.bordeaux-population-health.center/en/teams/vascular-and-neurological-diseases-integrative-and-genetic-epidemiology-vintage/), and adjunct associate professor in the department of neurology, Boston University, USA. S. Debette is a practicing neurologist since 2006 and holds a master degree in statistical genetics and a PhD in Epidemiology (2008). She obtained a Fulbright fellowship, a Chair of Excellence (French National Research Agency), and is member of a Leducq Transatlantic Network of Excellence on cerebral small vessel disease. Recently she received a European Research Council starting grant to study genetic determinants of early structural brain alterations in young students. She is actively involved in the Cohorts of Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, current vice-chair of the International Stroke Genetics Consortium (ISGC) steering committee, and coordinates the CADISP (Cervical Artery Dissection and Ischemic Stroke in young Patients) consortium.

PHILIP DE JAGER

Co-organizer, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard School of Medicine

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Dr. Philip De Jager is an Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Program in Translational NeuroPsychiatric Genomics within the Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry. He is the first incumbent of the Steven R. and Kathleen P. Haley Distinguished Chair for the Neurosciences at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

After completing Yale University with a degree in Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry as well as French literature, Dr. De Jager received a Ph.D. in Neurogenetics from Rockefeller University and an M.D. from Cornell University Medical College before completing his M.M.Sc. in Clinical Investigation at Harvard Medical School and MIT. He has previously served as a Clinical Fellow in Neurology at BWH and MGH, and is currently a practicing neurologist at the Multiple Sclerosis Center at BWH.

The goal of Dr. De Jager’s work as a clinician-scientist is to apply modern methods of neuroimmunology, statistical genetics and systems biology to the understanding of common neurodegenerative diseases. He has applied his discoveries from basic research to develop novel tools to enhance clinical decision-making, identify new therapeutic targets and test lead compounds to perturb the sequence of events leading from health to neurodegenerative diseases.

Dr. De Jager studies primarily multiple sclerosis (MS) and age-related cognitive decline. In both of these neurodegenerataive diseases, he is identifying molecular networks that contribute to pathophysiology and, thanks to support from a $7.9 million grant from the NIH’s Accelerating Medicines Partnership, he has built an analytic and experimental pipeline to validate target genes and discover new lead compounds in human neurons, astrocytes, macrophage and microglial cells.

CHRISTOPHE TZOURIO

Co-organizer, Bordeaux University

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Christophe Tzourio is Professor of epidemiology at Bordeaux University and director of the Bordeaux Population Health Research Center UMR Inserm 1219. Dr. Tzourio is especially interested in studying the consequences of blood pressure on the brain and particularly through the study of MRI small-vessels related brain lesions. He co-authored >280 peer-reviewed articles and is ranked among the top 1% of highly cited scientists by the ISI Web of Science. Dr. Tzourio is currently PI of the 3C study, a population based cohort study in >9000 elderly individuals which aims at evaluating the importance of vascular factors in dementia. He is also PI of the i- Share study, an ongoing large student cohort aiming at studying students’ health as well as early determinants of common diseases occurring later in life. 

BRADFORD B WORRALL

University of Virginia, Charlottesville

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Bradford B Worrall is a Professor of Neurology and Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia and director of the Vascular Neurology Fellowship there. He has been active in numerous stoke genetics trials over the past 15 years including the Ischaemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS), the Siblings with Ischaemic Stroke Study (SWISS), the Genetics of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Anticoagulation (GOCHA) study and the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) study. He co-PI'd a U-01 funded GWAS of treatement response grant with Michele Sale using the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) trial. The overall project is known as the Genome-wide Association Research Network into Effects of Treatment (GARNET) and includes a wide range of randomised clinical trials in many disease types. He is a founding member of the International Stroke Genetics Consortium and runs a translational stroke genetics laboratory at the University of Virginia. Dr. Worrall is a co-Principal investigator  of the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) which funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and co-chairs the Phenotype Harmonization committee. Dr. Worrall is an Associate Editor for the journal Neurology where he handles the cerebrovascular disease, neurocritical care, and education portfolios.

DONNA CHEN

University of Virginia, Charlottesville

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Donna Chen is Associate Professor in the Center for Biomedical Ethics, Department of Public Health Sciences, and Department of Psychiatry & Neurobehavioral Sciences at the University of Virginia School of Medicine.  Dr. Chen’s scholarly work addresses questions in clinical and research ethics, largely related to the clinical neurosciences; professional and organizational ethics; and ethics education.  An award-winning educator, she teaches ethics across the University setting to students in undergraduate, graduate, medical, law, public health and nursing programs and to research trainees and faculty at all levels aiming always to instill an appreciation for asking good questions and seeking answers that are practical, relevant, and honor important ethical values. Her ethics research aims to advance knowledge through conceptual analyses and empirical research, which in turn helps guide developments in ethics practices, policies, and normative understandings. Dr. Chen has consulted to researchers and policy-makers at institutions in the US and abroad and served on committees related to clinical and research ethics, including for the National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, National Institute for Drug Abuse, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine, and the American Psychiatric Association. As a physician-researcher whose work in ethics connects theoretical concepts and empirical research to improve policy and practice, Dr. Chen sees her scholarly contributions as a form of “translational research” in bioethics. 

PAUL THOMPSON

University of South California, Los Angeles

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Paul Thompson directs the USC Imaging Genetics Center and serves as Associate Director of the new Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics at the University of Southern California. At USC, he is a Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Engineering, and Ophthalmology and serves as Associate Dean for Research at the Keck USC School of Medicine. He co-founded and leads the Enhancing Neuro Imaging Genetics Through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) consortium, a worldwide medical network of 125 institutions studying the major diseases of the brain. ENIGMA discovers factors that affect the progression on Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, schizophrenia, depression and bipolar illness, HIV/AIDS, methamphetamine abuse, autism, and childhood brain disorders. One study unites teams from the Thai Red Cross, the US, and South Africa to study how treatments restore brain growth in HIV-infected children. His group also created the first maps of Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia in the living brain, and a method to detect brain growth in children . Thompson obtained his M.A. in Mathematics and Classical Languages from Oxford University, England, and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from UCLA.

ANITA DESTEFANO

Boston University

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Anita L. DeStefano, Ph.D. is Professor of Biostatistics and Neurology, and Associate Director of the BUMC Genome Science Institute. She served for 10 years as Co-Director of the Biostatistics Graduate Program and is current Director of the Graduate Certificate Program in Statistical Genetics. Dr. DeStefano developed a course in Statistical Genetics (BS858), which is taught to MPH, Biostatistics Program, and other graduate students. She is also an instructor and co-PI of the BU Summer Institute for Research Education in Biostatistics program.  Her main research interest is statistical genetics. She was an investigator in the multi-national GenePD study working to identify the genes contributing Parkinson Disease. Dr. DeStefano is also a senior statistical geneticist for the Framingham Heart Study focusing on stroke, Alzheimer disease and related endophenotypes including brain MRI measures. She is a key member of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium Neurology working group and of the International Genomics of Alzheimer Disease (IGAP) consortium. She is currently co-leading QC efforts and is active in analyses in the joint NHGRI/NIA Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project. She is PI of a study that is examining gene expression measures from RNA and microRNA sequencing in post-mortem brain tissue from multiple brain regions in relationship to lifetime obesity status.

LENORE J LAUNER

National Institutes of Aging, Bethesda

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After receiving her PhD in epidemiology from Cornell University and completed her post-doctoral studies at the National Institutes of Health in the U.S. In 1990, Dr. Launer moved to the Netherlands, where she held coordinated European Dementia initiatives and research on migraine. In 1999 she joined the National Institute on Aging, US to lead the Neuroepidemiology Section of the Intramural Research Program. Studies in the Neuroepidemiology Section focus on understanding the contribution of genetic, inflammatory, metabolic, vascular, and hormonal factors to well characterized continuously and discretely measured sub-clinical and clinical phenotypes in brain disease and investigating the links between brain disease and other common diseases of old age. Research is conducted using large epidemiologic studies, including the HAAS, GES-Reykjavik Study, and CARDIA, which allow testing in the general population, hypotheses on risk/protective factors and mechanisms identified in experimental and clinical studies. Dr. Launer has developed research resources to investigate the association of these physiologic measures to brain structure and function at different periods in life, and at different stages of the disease processes leading to dementia. 

ZDENKA PAUSOVA

Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, and Toronto University

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Dr. Pausova obtained her MD degree from Purkyně University (Czech Republic) in 1986. She then received research training in Genetics at McGill University and the University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada (1990-1998). Currently, Dr. Pausova is Senior Scientist in the Hospital for Sick Children and Professor in the Departments of Physiology and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, Canada. Her research focuses on the causes and health consequences of adolescent and adult obesity. She co-directs the Saguenay Youth Study aimed at investigating cardiometabolic and brain health, and its genetic and epigenetic modifiers, in 2,000 Canadian adolescents and their parents (http://www.saguenay-youth-study.org). She has published 139 peer-reviewed papers and 4 book chapters. She has received the Award for Excellence in Research from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and is an elected Fellow of the American Heart Association.

Main Research Projects

  • Obesity as a risk factor of cardiometabolic and brain disease

  • Eating behavior, addiction and brain-structure correlates

  • Genetic and environmental factors modulating DNA methylation in health and disease

 

Research Methodology

  • Cardiometabolic Physiology

  • Nutrition

  • Lipidomics

  • Epidemiology

  • Population Genetics and Epigenetics

TOMAS PAUS

University of Toronto

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Dr. Paus is the Tanenbaum Chair in Population Neuroscience at Baycrest, Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Toronto, and the Dr. John and Consuela Phelan Scholar at Child Mind Institute in New York. His work integrates epidemiology, neuroscience and genetics – through a new discipline of population neuroscience - in the pursuit of knowledge relevant for child and youth mental health.

The work published by Dr. Paus and his colleagues have been well received by peers, being cited in over 30,000 publications. In 2013, Springer published his book “Population Neuroscience”. Dr. Paus received the Royal Society Wolfson Merit Award, Gold Medal of the Masaryk University, is an elected member of the International Neuropsychology Symposium and an elected fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, serves as Associate Editor of the Human Brain Mapping and Social Neuroscience, and as a member of several Scientific Advisory Boards in Europe and North America.

DAN CHASMAN

Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School

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DAN CHASMAN

Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School

An Associate Professor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School Boston, Daniel Chasman, PhD is interested in genome-wide genetic analysis of cardiovascular traits and other related phenotypes. In particular, his research emphasizes genetic studies of plasma lipid components, inflammatory biomarkers, pharmacologic effects in cardiovascular medicine, and migraine. This research area is complemented by a secondary interest in applications of genome-wide functional annotations for inferring the biological mechanisms underlying genetic signals. Previously, he was Director of Computational Biology and Statistical Genetics at Variagenics, a biotechnology company in Cambridge Massachusetts engaged in exploring the potential of genetics for optimizing drug therapies.

CORNELIA VAN DUIJN

Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam

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Cornelia van Duijn is a professor of Genetic Epidemiology at the Department of Epidemiology of the Erasmus University Medical Center. Cornelia van Duijn is involved as a principle investigator in three large-scale population- and family-based studies: the Erasmus Rucphen Family (ERF) study, the Rotterdam study and Generation R. Her work focuses on –omics research in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson’s disease, Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and open angle glaucoma. She is a leader in several international genome wide association consortia including CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart & Aging Research in Genome Epidemiology), IGAP (International Genetics of Alzheimer Disease Project (IGAP), ADSP (Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project) and IGGC (International Genetics of Glaucoma Consortium). Over the years, she served on various scientific committees, including the International Society for Genetic Epidemiology (IGES), the American and European Society for Human Genetics (ASHG, ESHG). She founded the MSc and PhD program in Genetic Epidemiology of the Erasmus University Medical Center of which she is the scientific director. Since 2014, she is a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

M. ARFAN IKRAM

Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam

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M. Arfan Ikram, MD, PhD is head of neuroepidemiology in the Rotterdam Study. He has a longstanding interest in epidemiology of brain ageing and dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. Throughout his career he has used many state-of-the-art technologies implemented in population-based cohort studies. He has used a wide variety of imaging techniques, including structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, phase-contrast angiography and CT-scanning, as well as post-processing algorithms, including (semi-)automatic segmentation, linear and non-linear registration, voxel-based analysis, and tractography, to study various aspects of neurodegenerative disease. Additionally, he has broad expertise in conventional and emerging genomics technologies, including whole-genome genotyping arrays, exome arrays, and exome sequencing. In recent years, he has published several studies that combine imaging and genetics in the study of neurodegenerative disease. Dr. Ikram has published over 200 peer-reviewed articles and has a H-index of 34. He co-leads several national and international consortia, including neuro-CHARGE, UNIVERSE, JPND HD-READY, Dutch ImaGene.

BERNARD MAZOYER

Bordeaux University

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Bernard MAZOYER is a Professor Professor of Radiology at Bordeaux University, and a member of the the Groupe d’Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle (GIN, team#5 of the Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives) jointly funded by CNRS and CEA. After graduating from Ecole Normale Supérieure (Mathematics), he received hi PhD in Biomathematics and his MD from Paris University. During his postdoc at UC Berkeley he worked on advanced PET and MRI instrumentation, and later pioneerd functional neuroimaging with PET at the CEA-Orsay where he created the first cognitive neuroimaging laboratory in France. In 1996 he took the leadership of the Cyceron neuroimaging center in Caen, wher  he pioneered population neuroMRI through the EVA and 3 Cities cohorts. In 2011, he moved to Bordeaux with the GIN, focusing his research on the identification of factors affecting human variability using population neuroimaging. He is the PI of the MRi Share study. Bernard Mazoyer has published over 230 articles that received 15,000+ citations (H-factor at 62). He has been the 1st Chairman of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, received the Seymour Cray Prize in supercomputing and the Dagnan Bouveret Prize from the French National Academy, and is an honorary member of the Institut Universitaire de France.

CAROLE DUFOUIL

Bordeaux University

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Carole Dufouil is research director at Inserm Center UMR897. She has published over 120 articles in international journals (H-index 40) and is editor of Alzheimer’s and Dementia: translational research & clinical interventions. Her research is focused on the determinants of cerebral neurological diseases, particularly Alzheimer’s disease. She is particularly interested in the role of vascular risk factor exposure and cognitively stimulating activities, and in imaging markers (PET, MRI) of brain aging and disease. She is also interested in the methodological challenges related to the analysis of studies on the determinants of brain health and has created the international Melodem initiative, which aims at harmonizing analytical approaches in longitudinal studies on dementia. Dr. Dufouil is co-PI of the 3C-Dijon study and co-PI of the Memento study, a national clinical cohort, which was set up in the context of the Alzheimer Plan 2008-2013 and aims at improving our understanding of the natural course of Alzheimer’s disease.

MYRIAM FORNAGE

University of Texas

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Dr. Fornage is a tenured Professor of Molecular Medicine and Human Genetics and the Laurence and Johanna Favrot Distinguished Professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas. Her research program investigates the genetics and genomics of brain vascular disease and brain aging, both, in its clinical and pre-clinical forms in well-characterized populations from young adulthood to old age. As the recipient of numerous grant awards from the National Institutes of Health, she has conducted large-scale genetic studies that have led to the identification of novel genes for brain vascular disease, brain aging and related MRI endophenotypes. She is an active investigator of several large national and international consortia, including the Cohorts of Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) consortium, the NINDS Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), and the NIA Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project (ADSP). She regularly serves on NIH expert advisory panels, including as a regular member of the Genetics of Health and Disease (GHD) study section. She is member of the Leadership Committee of the Functional Genomics and Translational Biology Council and a member of the Stroke Statistics Committee of the Epidemiology & Prevention Council of the American Heart Association. 

GANESH CHAUHAN

Bordeaux University      

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Dr. Chauhan is a genetic epidemiologist with focus on identifying genes involved in age related neurological conditions. He uses both genome wide association studies (GWAS) and whole exome sequencing (WES) approaches to identify common and rare variants in genes leading to diseases. He has a background of molecular biology, statistics and bioinformatics.

He has been working for the last two and a half years as a post-doctoral research fellow in Prof. Stéphanie Debette’s team. The various projects that he has been involved in her lab are mentioned below:

  • Genotype imputation in 3C-Dijon data using the latest 1000G imputation panel

  • Performing large scale GWAS of multiple phenotypes

  • Trans-ethnic meta-analysis of GWAS for stroke, brain infarcts and gray matter volume as part of collaboration with CHARGE consortium

  • Whole exome sequencing analysis to identify genes for cerebral small vessel disease

YOCIHIRO KAMANTANI  

RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences

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Yoichiro Kamatani is Team Leader of the Laboratory for Statistical  Analysis, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Japan, and an affiliate member of McGill University Department of Human Genetics, Canada. He was a main analyst of the CADISP (Cervical Artery Dissection and Ischemic Stroke in young Patients) consortium and a member of the IGAP (International Genomics of Alzheimer Disease) consortium. Now he is leading statistical genetics analysis of 200,000 participants in the BioBank Japan project.

NATALIA ROST 

MGH, Harvard School of Medcine 

Dr. Natalia Rost is Director of the Acute Stroke Service at Massachusetts General Hospital and Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. As clinician-scientist, Dr. Rost dedicated her career to care of patients with stroke and reducing the burden of post-stroke disability through innovative investigations. She is broadly recognized as an expert in neuroimaging markers of cerebrovascular disease, genetics of stroke, and outcome prediction in patients with acute stroke.   

Dr. Rost has an established line of research aiming to unravel the role of pre-existing burden of cerebrovascular disease on susceptibility of brain tissue to acute ischemia, which has been continuously supported by the NIH and foundations including National Stroke Association, Bugher Foundation of the American Heart Association, and the NIH Career Development Award (K23).  Dr. Rost is Principal Investigator on the NIH-NINDSR01 NS082285 (SALVO study) and NS086905 (MRI-GENIE study), as well as co-investigator on the multiple multidisciplinary, multi-center collaborations involving the US-based NINDS StrokeNET clinical trials network and the International Stroke Genetics Consortium.   

 

Dr. Rost is an author of numerous peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, and a co-author of the “MGH Handbook of Neurology.”   She currently serves as the President of the Boston Board of the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association; Vice Chair of the American Academy of Neurology Science Committee; and Assistant Editor of the journal STROKE.   

 

Dr. Rost received her M.D. from Boston University School of Medicine and a Master of Public Health degree from Harvard School of Public Health.  She trained in Neurology and Vascular Neurology at the Massachusetts General and Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Partners residency and fellowship programs.  Dr. Rost is practicing neurology at MGH since 2006.

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JOSHUA BIS

UNIVERSITY OF WASHTINGTON 

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Joshua Bis is currently a Research Scientist with the University of Washington's Cardiovascular Health Research Unit. He received his PhD in Epidemiology from the University of Washington School of Public Health. Dr. Bis's primary research interest is in understanding the role of genomic variation with traits relevant to cardiovascular health and aging. 

 

Locally, Dr. Bis has pursued these questions within the Cardiovascular Health Study and the Heart and Vascular Health Studies. He is also involved in several large-scale genomics collaborations: he co-leads working groups in the CHARGE consortium and the Alzheimer's Disease Sequencing Project and has actively participated in the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project (ESP), the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP), and the Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program.  

 

In these settings, his work has focused on analysis methods, drug-gene interactions, clinical and subclinical atherosclerosis, cardiovascular risk factors, and a broad range of neurological traits including stroke, brain imaging endophenotypes, and Alzheimer's disease.

JOSÉE DUPUIS

Boston University 

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Josée Dupuis, Ph.D, is a Professor and Interim Chair of Biostatistics at Boston University School of Public Health. She previously held a faculty position at Northwestern University and she was a senior statistical geneticist at Genome Therapeutics Corporation, a small biotech company, prior to joining Boston University in 2003. She has extensive experience in the development and application of methods for mapping complex traits, and she has published over 170 articles in the field of statistical genetics. Her methodological contributions include genome-wide significance level, mapping of quantitative traits in experimental organisms and robust quantitative trait linkage and association analysis methods in extended pedigrees. Her recent work involves the development of rare variant association tests in families, and approaches to detect gene x gene and gene x environment interactions, with meta-analysis extensions. She is involved in the Framingham Heart Study, collaborating on projects to identify genes influencing diabetes related traits, pulmonary function and Alzheimer’s’ Disease. Professor Dupuis is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA), a Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and she is President of the International Genetic Epidemiology Society.

CAROLE DUFOUIL

Bordeaux University

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SUDHA SESHADRI

Co-organizer, Boston University

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Dr. Sudha Seshadri, MD, is a Professor of Neurology at the Boston University School of Medicine and a Senior Investigator at the Framingham Heart Study. She is recognized as a leading expert in risk factor and genomic epidemiologic studies of stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and brain aging including MRI and cognitive endophenotypes. She receives substantial research grant support from the National Institutes of Health as Principal investigator on multiple R01s and is a key investigator at the Framingham Heart Study and in several international genetic collaborations. She leads the Neurology Phenotype Working Group within the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, is a Principal Investigator on the Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project and serves as Vice-Chair of the METASTROKE consortium. She is board-certified neurologist with a clinical practice covering general neurology and dementia, teaches a 3-week introductory Neurology course to medical students and mentors post-doctoral fellows and junior-faculty from several countries including the United States, Canada, Israel, France and Australia. Dr. Seshadri has been invited to participate as a Plenary Speaker and expert at several national and international symposia. She serves on the editorial boards of the journals Neurology, Stroke and Journal of Alzheimer Disease and also Chairs the NIH NAME (Neurological, Aging and Musculoskeletal Epidemiology) Study Section in addition to serving as a reviewer for numerous international funding agencies.

STÉPHANIE DEBETTE

Co-organizer, Bordeaux University

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Stéphanie Debette is Professor of epidemiology and neurology at Bordeaux University and INSERM U1219 (where she directs a team of vascular and neurological diseases: integrative and genetic epidemiology: http://www.bordeaux-population-health.center/en/teams/vascular-and-neurological-diseases-integrative-and-genetic-epidemiology-vintage/), and adjunct associate professor in the department of neurology, Boston University, USA. S. Debette is a practicing neurologist since 2006 and holds a master degree in statistical genetics and a PhD in Epidemiology (2008). She obtained a Fulbright fellowship, a Chair of Excellence (French National Research Agency), and is member of a Leducq Transatlantic Network of Excellence on cerebral small vessel disease. Recently she received a European Research Council starting grant to study genetic determinants of early structural brain alterations in young students. She is actively involved in the Cohorts of Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, current vice-chair of the International Stroke Genetics Consortium (ISGC) steering committee, and coordinates the CADISP (Cervical Artery Dissection and Ischemic Stroke in young Patients) consortium.

PHILIP DE JAGER

Co-organizer, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard School of Medicine

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Dr. Philip De Jager is an Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Program in Translational NeuroPsychiatric Genomics within the Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry. He is the first incumbent of the Steven R. and Kathleen P. Haley Distinguished Chair for the Neurosciences at Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

After completing Yale University with a degree in Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry as well as French literature, Dr. De Jager received a Ph.D. in Neurogenetics from Rockefeller University and an M.D. from Cornell University Medical College before completing his M.M.Sc. in Clinical Investigation at Harvard Medical School and MIT. He has previously served as a Clinical Fellow in Neurology at BWH and MGH, and is currently a practicing neurologist at the Multiple Sclerosis Center at BWH.

The goal of Dr. De Jager’s work as a clinician-scientist is to apply modern methods of neuroimmunology, statistical genetics and systems biology to the understanding of common neurodegenerative diseases. He has applied his discoveries from basic research to develop novel tools to enhance clinical decision-making, identify new therapeutic targets and test lead compounds to perturb the sequence of events leading from health to neurodegenerative diseases.

Dr. De Jager studies primarily multiple sclerosis (MS) and age-related cognitive decline. In both of these neurodegenerataive diseases, he is identifying molecular networks that contribute to pathophysiology and, thanks to support from a $7.9 million grant from the NIH’s Accelerating Medicines Partnership, he has built an analytic and experimental pipeline to validate target genes and discover new lead compounds in human neurons, astrocytes, macrophage and microglial cells.

Agustín Ruiz, M.D., Ph.D.

Scientific Director of Fundació ACE

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Current position: Scientific Director. Fundació ACE. Barcelona Alzheimer Treatment & Research Center. Coordinator of IMI2 European Project ADAPTED on APOE biology. Education: Degree in Medicine (MD) in 1993. Faculty of Medicine and Surgery. University of Seville. PhD in Molecular and Cell Biology (University of Seville) in 1999. Previous positions, research experience and awards: PhD student and post-doctoral position in the Genetic Department. Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocío. Seville. (1993-2001). Extraordinary PhD Thesis award. University of Seville (2000). Member of the ethics committee of the Spanish society of Genetics (2003-2007). Promoter and co-founder of several biotech enterprises (2001-2011). Best business idea and business plan (Biotechnology sector). Instituto Internacional San Telmo (2001).  Business Excellence award. Innovation area. Regional Government of Andalucia (Spain)(2008). Co-authors of 135 indexed scientific articles and seven patents, participant in 37 public and private research grants.  Main Scientifc interest: identification of genes related to human diseases.

BRADFORD B WORRALL

University of Virginia, Charlottesville

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Bradford B Worrall is a Professor of Neurology and Public Health Sciences at the University of Virginia and director of the Vascular Neurology Fellowship there. He has been active in numerous stoke genetics trials over the past 15 years including the Ischaemic Stroke Genetics Study (ISGS), the Siblings with Ischaemic Stroke Study (SWISS), the Genetics of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Anticoagulation (GOCHA) study and the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm (FIA) study. He co-PI'd a U-01 funded GWAS of treatement response grant with Michele Sale using the Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) trial. The overall project is known as the Genome-wide Association Research Network into Effects of Treatment (GARNET) and includes a wide range of randomised clinical trials in many disease types. He is a founding member of the International Stroke Genetics Consortium and runs a translational stroke genetics laboratory at the University of Virginia. Dr. Worrall is a co-Principal investigator  of the Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN) which funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and co-chairs the Phenotype Harmonization committee. Dr. Worrall is the Deputy Editor for Neurology. where he handles the cerebrovascular disease, neurocritical care, and education portfolios.

DONNA CHEN

University of Virginia, Charlottesville

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Donna Chen is Associate Professor in the Center for Biomedical Ethics, Department of Public Health Sciences, and Department of Psychiatry & Neurobehavioral Sciences at the University of Virginia School of Medicine.  Dr. Chen’s scholarly work addresses questions in clinical and research ethics, largely related to the clinical neurosciences; professional and organizational ethics; and ethics education.  An award-winning educator, she teaches ethics across the University setting to students in undergraduate, graduate, medical, law, public health and nursing programs and to research trainees and faculty at all levels aiming always to instill an appreciation for asking good questions and seeking answers that are practical, relevant, and honor important ethical values. Her ethics research aims to advance knowledge through conceptual analyses and empirical research, which in turn helps guide developments in ethics practices, policies, and normative understandings. Dr. Chen has consulted to researchers and policy-makers at institutions in the US and abroad and served on committees related to clinical and research ethics, including for the National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, National Institute for Drug Abuse, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine, and the American Psychiatric Association. As a physician-researcher whose work in ethics connects theoretical concepts and empirical research to improve policy and practice, Dr. Chen sees her scholarly contributions as a form of “translational research” in bioethics. 

PAUL THOMPSON

University of South California, Los Angeles

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Paul Thompson directs the USC Imaging Genetics Center and serves as Associate Director of the new Institute for Neuroimaging and Informatics at the University of Southern California. At USC, he is a Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry, Radiology, Pediatrics, Engineering, and Ophthalmology and serves as Associate Dean for Research at the Keck USC School of Medicine. He co-founded and leads the Enhancing Neuro Imaging Genetics Through Meta-Analysis (ENIGMA) consortium, a worldwide medical network of 125 institutions studying the major diseases of the brain. ENIGMA discovers factors that affect the progression on Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, schizophrenia, depression and bipolar illness, HIV/AIDS, methamphetamine abuse, autism, and childhood brain disorders. One study unites teams from the Thai Red Cross, the US, and South Africa to study how treatments restore brain growth in HIV-infected children. His group also created the first maps of Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia in the living brain, and a method to detect brain growth in children . Thompson obtained his M.A. in Mathematics and Classical Languages from Oxford University, England, and his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from UCLA.

ANITA DESTEFANO

Boston University

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Anita L. DeStefano, Ph.D. is Professor of Biostatistics and Neurology, and Associate Director of the BUMC Genome Science Institute. She served for 10 years as Co-Director of the Biostatistics Graduate Program and is current Director of the Graduate Certificate Program in Statistical Genetics. Dr. DeStefano developed a course in Statistical Genetics (BS858), which is taught to MPH, Biostatistics Program, and other graduate students. She is also an instructor and co-PI of the BU Summer Institute for Research Education in Biostatistics program.  Her main research interest is statistical genetics. She was an investigator in the multi-national GenePD study working to identify the genes contributing Parkinson Disease. Dr. DeStefano is also a senior statistical geneticist for the Framingham Heart Study focusing on stroke, Alzheimer disease and related endophenotypes including brain MRI measures. She is a key member of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium Neurology working group and of the International Genomics of Alzheimer Disease (IGAP) consortium. She is currently co-leading QC efforts and is active in analyses in the joint NHGRI/NIA Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project. She is PI of a study that is examining gene expression measures from RNA and microRNA sequencing in post-mortem brain tissue from multiple brain regions in relationship to lifetime obesity status.

LENORE J LAUNER

National Institutes of Aging, Bethesda

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After receiving her PhD in epidemiology from Cornell University and completed her post-doctoral studies at the National Institutes of Health in the U.S. In 1990, Dr. Launer moved to the Netherlands, where she held coordinated European Dementia initiatives and research on migraine. In 1999 she joined the National Institute on Aging, US to lead the Neuroepidemiology Section of the Intramural Research Program. Studies in the Neuroepidemiology Section focus on understanding the contribution of genetic, inflammatory, metabolic, vascular, and hormonal factors to well characterized continuously and discretely measured sub-clinical and clinical phenotypes in brain disease and investigating the links between brain disease and other common diseases of old age. Research is conducted using large epidemiologic studies, including the HAAS, GES-Reykjavik Study, and CARDIA, which allow testing in the general population, hypotheses on risk/protective factors and mechanisms identified in experimental and clinical studies. Dr. Launer has developed research resources to investigate the association of these physiologic measures to brain structure and function at different periods in life, and at different stages of the disease processes leading to dementia. 

ZDENKA PAUSOVA

Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, and Toronto University

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Dr. Pausova obtained her MD degree from Purkyně University (Czech Republic) in 1986. She then received research training in Genetics at McGill University and the University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada (1990-1998). Currently, Dr. Pausova is Senior Scientist in the Hospital for Sick Children and Professor in the Departments of Physiology and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Toronto, Canada. Her research focuses on the causes and health consequences of adolescent and adult obesity. She co-directs the Saguenay Youth Study aimed at investigating cardiometabolic and brain health, and its genetic and epigenetic modifiers, in 2,000 Canadian adolescents and their parents (http://www.saguenay-youth-study.org). She has published 139 peer-reviewed papers and 4 book chapters. She has received the Award for Excellence in Research from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and is an elected Fellow of the American Heart Association.

Main Research Projects

  • Obesity as a risk factor of cardiometabolic and brain disease

  • Eating behavior, addiction and brain-structure correlates

  • Genetic and environmental factors modulating DNA methylation in health and disease

 

Research Methodology

  • Cardiometabolic Physiology

  • Nutrition

  • Lipidomics

  • Epidemiology

  • Population Genetics and Epigenetics

TOMAS PAUS

University of Toronto

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Dr. Paus is the Tanenbaum Chair in Population Neuroscience at Baycrest, Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Toronto, and the Dr. John and Consuela Phelan Scholar at Child Mind Institute in New York. His work integrates epidemiology, neuroscience and genetics – through a new discipline of population neuroscience - in the pursuit of knowledge relevant for child and youth mental health.

The work published by Dr. Paus and his colleagues have been well received by peers, being cited in over 30,000 publications. In 2013, Springer published his book “Population Neuroscience”. Dr. Paus received the Royal Society Wolfson Merit Award, Gold Medal of the Masaryk University, is an elected member of the International Neuropsychology Symposium and an elected fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, serves as Associate Editor of the Human Brain Mapping and Social Neuroscience, and as a member of several Scientific Advisory Boards in Europe and North America.

DAN CHASMAN

Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School

DAN CHASMAN

Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School

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An Associate Professor at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School Boston, Daniel Chasman, PhD is interested in genome-wide genetic analysis of cardiovascular traits and other related phenotypes. In particular, his research emphasizes genetic studies of plasma lipid components, inflammatory biomarkers, pharmacologic effects in cardiovascular medicine, and migraine. This research area is complemented by a secondary interest in applications of genome-wide functional annotations for inferring the biological mechanisms underlying genetic signals. Previously, he was Director of Computational Biology and Statistical Genetics at Variagenics, a biotechnology company in Cambridge Massachusetts engaged in exploring the potential of genetics for optimizing drug therapies.

CORNELIA VAN DUIJN

Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam

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Cornelia van Duijn is a professor of Genetic Epidemiology at the Department of Epidemiology of the Erasmus University Medical Center. Cornelia van Duijn is involved as a principle investigator in three large-scale population- and family-based studies: the Erasmus Rucphen Family (ERF) study, the Rotterdam study and Generation R. Her work focuses on –omics research in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson’s disease, Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and open angle glaucoma. She is a leader in several international genome wide association consortia including CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart & Aging Research in Genome Epidemiology), IGAP (International Genetics of Alzheimer Disease Project (IGAP), ADSP (Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project) and IGGC (International Genetics of Glaucoma Consortium). Over the years, she served on various scientific committees, including the International Society for Genetic Epidemiology (IGES), the American and European Society for Human Genetics (ASHG, ESHG). She founded the MSc and PhD program in Genetic Epidemiology of the Erasmus University Medical Center of which she is the scientific director. Since 2014, she is a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.

M. ARFAN IKRAM

Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam

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M. Arfan Ikram, MD, PhD is head of neuroepidemiology in the Rotterdam Study. He has a longstanding interest in epidemiology of brain ageing and dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. Throughout his career he has used many state-of-the-art technologies implemented in population-based cohort studies. He has used a wide variety of imaging techniques, including structural MRI, diffusion tensor imaging, phase-contrast angiography and CT-scanning, as well as post-processing algorithms, including (semi-)automatic segmentation, linear and non-linear registration, voxel-based analysis, and tractography, to study various aspects of neurodegenerative disease. Additionally, he has broad expertise in conventional and emerging genomics technologies, including whole-genome genotyping arrays, exome arrays, and exome sequencing. In recent years, he has published several studies that combine imaging and genetics in the study of neurodegenerative disease. Dr. Ikram has published over 200 peer-reviewed articles and has a H-index of 34. He co-leads several national and international consortia, including neuro-CHARGE, UNIVERSE, JPND HD-READY, Dutch ImaGene.

BERNARD MAZOYER

Bordeaux University

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Bernard MAZOYER is a Professor Professor of Radiology at Bordeaux University, and a member of the the Groupe d’Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle (GIN, team#5 of the Institut des Maladies Neurodégénératives) jointly funded by CNRS and CEA. After graduating from from Ecole Normale Supérieure (Mathematics), he received his PhD in Biomathematics and his MD from Paris University. During his postdoc at UC Berkeley he worked on advanced PET and MRI instrumentation, and later pioneered functional neuroimaging with PET at the CEA-Orsay where he created the first cognitive neuroimaging laboratory in France. In 1996 he took the leadership of the Cyceron neuroimaging center in Caen, where he pioneered population neuroMRI through the EVA and 3 Cities cohorts. In 2011, he moved to Bordeaux with the GIN, focusing his research on the identification of factors affecting human variability using population neuroimaging. He is the PI of the MRi-Share study. Bernard Mazoyer has published over 230 articles that received 15,000+ citations (H-factor at 62). He has been the 1st Chairman of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, received the Seymour Cray Prize in supercomputing and the Dagnan Bouveret Prize from the French National Academy, and is an honorary member of the Institut Universitaire de France.

CAROLE DUFOUIL

Bordeaux University

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Carole Dufouil is research director at Inserm Center UMR897. She has published over 120 articles in international journals (H-index 40) and is editor of Alzheimer’s and Dementia: translational research & clinical interventions. Her research is focused on the determinants of cerebral neurological diseases, particularly Alzheimer’s disease. She is particularly interested in the role of vascular risk factor exposure and cognitively stimulating activities, and in imaging markers (PET, MRI) of brain aging and disease. She is also interested in the methodological challenges related to the analysis of studies on the determinants of brain health and has created the international Melodem initiative, which aims at harmonizing analytical approaches in longitudinal studies on dementia. Dr. Dufouil is co-PI of the 3C-Dijon study and co-PI of the Memento study, a national clinical cohort, which was set up in the context of the Alzheimer Plan 2008-2013 and aims at improving our understanding of the natural course of Alzheimer’s disease.

MYRIAM FORNAGE

University of Texas

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Dr. Fornage is a tenured Professor of Molecular Medicine and Human Genetics and the Laurence and Johanna Favrot Distinguished Professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Texas. Her research program investigates the genetics and genomics of brain vascular disease and brain aging, both, in its clinical and pre-clinical forms in well-characterized populations from young adulthood to old age. As the recipient of numerous grant awards from the National Institutes of Health, she has conducted large-scale genetic studies that have led to the identification of novel genes for brain vascular disease, brain aging and related MRI endophenotypes. She is an active investigator of several large national and international consortia, including the Cohorts of Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium, the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) consortium, the NINDS Stroke Genetics Network (SiGN), and the NIA Alzheimer Disease Sequencing Project (ADSP). She regularly serves on NIH expert advisory panels, including as a regular member of the Genetics of Health and Disease (GHD) study section. She is member of the Leadership Committee of the Functional Genomics and Translational Biology Council and a member of the Stroke Statistics Committee of the Epidemiology & Prevention Council of the American Heart Association. 

GANESH CHAUHAN

Bordeaux University      

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Dr. Chauhan is a genetic epidemiologist with focus on identifying genes involved in age related neurological conditions. He uses both genome wide association studies (GWAS) and whole exome sequencing (WES) approaches to identify common and rare variants in genes leading to diseases. He has a background of molecular biology, statistics and bioinformatics.

He has been working for the last two and a half years as a post-doctoral research fellow in Prof. Stéphanie Debette’s team. The various projects that he has been involved in her lab are mentioned below:

  • Genotype imputation in 3C-Dijon data using the latest 1000G imputation panel

  • Performing large scale GWAS of multiple phenotypes

  • Trans-ethnic meta-analysis of GWAS for stroke, brain infarcts and gray matter volume as part of collaboration with CHARGE consortium

  • Whole exome sequencing analysis to identify genes for cerebral small vessel disease

YOCIHIRO KAMANTANI  

RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences

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Yoichiro Kamatani is Team Leader of the Laboratory for Statistical  Analysis, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Japan, and an affiliate member of McGill University Department of Human Genetics, Canada. He was a main analyst of the CADISP (Cervical Artery Dissection and Ischemic Stroke in young Patients) consortium and a member of the IGAP (International Genomics of Alzheimer Disease) consortium. Now he is leading statistical genetics analysis of 200,000 participants in the BioBank Japan project.

NATALIA ROST 

MGH, Harvard School of Medicine 

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Dr. Natalia Rost is Director of the Acute Stroke Service at Massachusetts General Hospital and Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School. As clinician-scientist, Dr. Rost dedicated her career to care of patients with stroke and reducing the burden of post-stroke disability through innovative investigations. She is broadly recognized as an expert in neuroimaging markers of cerebrovascular disease, genetics of stroke, and outcome prediction in patients with acute stroke.   

Dr. Rost has an established line of research aiming to unravel the role of pre-existing burden of cerebrovascular disease on susceptibility of brain tissue to acute ischemia, which has been continuously supported by the NIH and foundations including National Stroke Association, Bugher Foundation of the American Heart Association, and the NIH Career Development Award (K23).  Dr. Rost is Principal Investigator on the NIH-NINDSR01 NS082285 (SALVO study) and NS086905 (MRI-GENIE study), as well as co-investigator on the multiple multidisciplinary, multi-center collaborations involving the US-based NINDS StrokeNET clinical trials network and the International Stroke Genetics Consortium.   

 

Dr. Rost is an author of numerous peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, and a co-author of the “MGH Handbook of Neurology.”   She currently serves as the President of the Boston Board of the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association; Vice Chair of the American Academy of Neurology Science Committee; and Assistant Editor of the journal STROKE.   

 

Dr. Rost received her M.D. from Boston University School of Medicine and a Master of Public Health degree from Harvard School of Public Health.  She trained in Neurology and Vascular Neurology at the Massachusetts General and Brigham & Women’s Hospital/Partners residency and fellowship programs.  Dr. Rost is practicing neurology at MGH since 2006.

JOSHUA BIS

UNIVERSITY OF WASHTINGTON 

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Joshua Bis is currently a Research Scientist with the University of Washington's Cardiovascular Health Research Unit. He received his PhD in Epidemiology from the University of Washington School of Public Health. Dr. Bis's primary research interest is in understanding the role of genomic variation with traits relevant to cardiovascular health and aging. 

 

Locally, Dr. Bis has pursued these questions within the Cardiovascular Health Study and the Heart and Vascular Health Studies. He is also involved in several large-scale genomics collaborations: he co-leads working groups in the CHARGE consortium and the Alzheimer's Disease Sequencing Project and has actively participated in the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project (ESP), the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP), and the Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program.  

 

In these settings, his work has focused on analysis methods, drug-gene interactions, clinical and subclinical atherosclerosis, cardiovascular risk factors, and a broad range of neurological traits including stroke, brain imaging endophenotypes, and Alzheimer's disease.

JOSÉE DUPUIS

Boston University 

JOSÉE DUPUIS

Boston University 

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Josée Dupuis, Ph.D, is a Professor and Interim Chair of Biostatistics at Boston University School of Public Health. She previously held a faculty position at Northwestern University and she was a senior statistical geneticist at Genome Therapeutics Corporation, a small biotech company, prior to joining Boston University in 2003. She has extensive experience in the development and application of methods for mapping complex traits, and she has published over 170 articles in the field of statistical genetics. Her methodological contributions include genome-wide significance level, mapping of quantitative traits in experimental organisms and robust quantitative trait linkage and association analysis methods in extended pedigrees. Her recent work involves the development of rare variant association tests in families, and approaches to detect gene x gene and gene x environment interactions, with meta-analysis extensions. She is involved in the Framingham Heart Study, collaborating on projects to identify genes influencing diabetes related traits, pulmonary function and Alzheimer’s’ Disease. Professor Dupuis is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA), a Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and she is President of the International Genetic Epidemiology Society.

MANOLIS KELLIS 

Member of the Broad Institute of MIT & Harvard 

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Manolis Kellis is a Professor of Computer Science at MIT, an Institute Member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and a member of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab at MIT where he directs the MIT Computational Biology Group (compbio.mit.edu). His research has spanned an unusually broad spectrum of areas, including disease genetics, epigenomics, gene circuitry, non-coding RNAs, comparative genomics, and phylogenetics. He has authored more than 140 journal publications that have been cited more than 36,000 times. He has helped direct several large-scale genomics projects, including the Roadmap Epigenomics project, the comparative analysis of 29 mammals, the human and the Drosophila Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, and the Genotype Tissue-Expression (GTEx) project. He received the US Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE), the NSF CAREER award, the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship. He obtained his Ph.D. from MIT, where he received the Sprowls award for the best doctorate thesis in computer science. He lived in Greece and France before moving to the US.

KEITH JOHNSON 

Harvard Medical School

Dr. Johnson is a Professor of Radiology and Neurology at the Harvard Medical School. He is also an Associate Radiologist and the Director of Molecular Neuroimaging in the Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (Department of Radiology) at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Dr. Johnson also serves as an associate physician and staff neurologist in the Memory Disorders Unit at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital as well as a Clinical Associate in Neurology at the MGH.

 

Dr. Johnson is co-director of the Neuroimaging Program of the Massachusetts Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and its Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) research initiatives. He oversees the Clinical Brain Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Service at the MGH and also practices as a neurologist that specializes in neurodegenerative disorders.

 

Dr. Johnson maintains an Internet teaching atlas of neuroimaging known as the Whole Brain Atlas: www.med.harvard.edu/AANLIB/home.html

ALBERT HOFMAN

Harvard Medical School 

Albert Hofman, MD, PhD is the Chair of the Department of Epidemiology and the Stephen B. Kay Family Professor of Public Health and Clinical Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts (USA). Dr. Hofman was the chairman of the department of Epidemiology of the Erasmus Medical Center/Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands, from 1988, until 2016. He has been science director of the graduate school Netherlands Institute for Health sciences (Nihes) since its start in 1990, until 2015.

Dr. Hofman is the initiator and principal investigator of two population based, prospective cohort studies in the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands: the Rotterdam Study and the Generation R study. Data-collection for these studies started in 1990 and 2002, respectively. These cohort studies have in common that they target multiple common diseases, have a very extensive and state-of-the-art assessment of the putative determinants of these diseases, and employ as much as possible new technologies to be applied in the setting of epidemiologic population studies.

The study of a multiple outcomes, in particular neurological, cardiovascular and endocrine diseases, has enabled the investigation of the interrelations of those diseases, and thereby of the co-morbidity and co-etiology of various diseases with a large population burden. This has made the findings in these studies generally useful for public health purposes as well as for clinical medicine.

The new technologies for epidemiologic studies include the genome-wide assessment and large-scale imaging of whole cohorts. The Rotterdam Study was one of the five founding cohorts of the very productive CHARGE consortium which has performed many successful genome-wide association studies that found a large number of genes involved in common diseases. The Rotterdam Study also pioneered new population imaging modalities, including magnetic resonance imaging since 1995. More recently the Generation R study has an MRI facility and is conducting one of the first large-scale populations based brain-imaging studies in children.

VASAN RAMACHANDRAN 

Boston University 

Dr. Vasan S. Ramachandran received his medical degree from and completed his residency in internal medicine and fellowship in cardiology at the All India Institute Of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India. He is currently a Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health, and Chief of the Section of Preventive medicine and Epidemiology in the department of Medicine, BUSM. He is the Principal Investigator of the Framingham Heart Study and the Director of the Study at Boston University. Additionally, he is the Co-Director of the Vascular and Echocardiography Laboratory at the Framingham Heart Study. He is also the Co-Director of the Framingham Heart Study fellowship program, and Principal Investigator of a Multidisciplinary post-doctoral T32 program in in cardiovascular epidemiology at BUSM. He is the recipient of several RO1 awards and a UO1 from the NHLBI/NIH and a past recipient of a mid-career clinical investigator award (K24).

 

Dr. Ramachandran is the recipient of many prestigious awards including: The All India Institute of Medical Sciences Prizes for excellence in general surgery (1982), the Jagdish Lal Kapila gold medal for excellence in cardiology (1989), and the Searle Award, the highest award of the Cardiology Society of India (1989). He has received mentoring awards from the AHA and the prestigious Population Science award from the AHA.

 

Dr. Ramachandran's research interests include heart failure, echocardiography, high blood pressure, and risk prediction. Dr. Ramachandran has published on a wide range of cardiology-related topics, authoring or co-authoring over 675 referenced articles, book chapters, and abstracts. His research has appeared in such journals as The New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Medical Association, British Medical Journal, Stroke, and Journal of the American College of Cardiology. His numerous professional association memberships include the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.

MOHAMMAD KAMRAN IKRAM

Erasmus Medical Center

Mohammad Kamran IKRAM, MD PhD MSc, is currently an Associate Professor at the Departments of Neurology and Epidemiology of the Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands and a visiting Associate Professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, MA, USA. Within the Rotterdam Study, he is leading the work on the epidemiology of clinical cerebrovascular diseases.

 

Dr. Ikram completed his dual training in Epidemiology (PhD 2005) and Neurology (Dutch Specialist Board Certified 2010) at the Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Subsequently, between 2011-2015 he worked at the Duke-NUS Medical School, National University of Singapore and the Singapore Eye Research Institute, where his research was focused on the use of retinal and neuro-imaging in the study of stroke and dementia. In addition, during this period he was Principal Investigator of the Epidemiology of Dementia in Singapore (EDIS) Study, which is part of the Memory Aging and Cognition Centre (MACC) at the National University Health System in Singapore. The EDIS Study is sub-study within the population-based Singapore Epidemiology of Eye Study (SEED) focusing on the prevalence and risk factors of dementia among three ethnicities (Chinese, Malay and Indians). Over these years, Dr. Ikram research activities have covered a broad spectrum of epidemiological research both in Neurology and Ophthalmology. These include cerebrovascular diseases, dementia, stroke, novel retinal imaging and diabetic retinopathy. Dr. Ikram has published >150 peer-reviewed articles.

KAMESHWAR PRASAD

All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS)

KAMESHWAR PRASAD

All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS)

Dr. Kameshwar Prasad is Professor and Head of the Department of Neurology at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, India. He has more than 35 years of clinical, teaching and research experience and has published more than 270 papers (>125 in Stroke) in peer reviewed journals of national and international repute.

 

Dr. Prasad has been invited more than 30 times to teach in several international universities including Oxford (3 times), McMaster University, Canada (>10 times), National University, Singapore (7 times), Arabian Gulf University (10 times) and many others across India and the globe. He is a member of the World Stroke Organization Global Quality and Guidelines Working Group. He is also Editor and Reviewer of the International Cochrane Collaborative Stroke Review Group based in Edinburgh, UK.

He is Principal Investigator of the first of its kind Cohort study in India entitled “A population-based cohort study to unravel the causes of stroke and cognitive decline” in collaboration with the Rotterdam Study Group, Erasmus MC, The Netherlands. Under UK-India Education & Research Initiative, he has established the largest blood bio-repository of stroke in India, in collaboration with Imperial College, London, UK.

DEBORAH BLACKER

Harvard University

Deborah Blacker, MD, ScD is Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and Deputy Chair and Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She is a geriatric psychiatrist and epidemiologist based at Mass General Hospital, where she directs the Gerontology Research Unit and serves Associate Chief for Research in the Department of Psychiatry. Her work focuses on the epidemiology, genetics, assessment, and early recognition of Alzheimer’s disease, and she serves as co-leader of the Education and Clinical Cores for the Mass Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, and leader of the Analytic Core for the Harvard Aging Brain Study investigating earliest brain changes in Alzheimer’s disease. She is involved in multiple local and national studies regarding Alzheimer’s disease genetics and epidemiology, and leads the AlzRisk project to develop a curated online catalog of Alzheimer risk factor studies (www.alzrisk.org). She is also actively involved in teaching and methodologic research at HSPH, where she co-directs the Psychiatric Epidemiology concentration and teaches a course on assessment methods in psychiatric epidemiologic research. She served on the DSM-5 Neurocognitive Disorders Workgroup, and the American Psychiatric Association’s Workgroup to Revise the Practice Guideline for Dementia.

STEVEN GREENBERG

Harvard University

Dr. Greenberg is Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School, Vice Chair of Neurology for Faculty Development and Promotions, and John J Conway Endowed Chair in Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). He has served in many national and international leadership roles in the fields of stroke and neurology including president of the International CAA Association, chair of the NIH Acute Neurologic Injury and Epilepsy grant review committee, co-chair for the NINDS Alzheimer’s Disease-Related Dementias Summit subcommittee on vascular cognitive impairment, and chair of the American Heart Association International Stroke Conference. 

 

Under Dr. Greenberg’s leadership, the MGH Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program has become internationally recognized for ground-breaking studies on the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA).  Among the group’s milestone achievements in the CAA field have been developing and validating the widely adopted Boston Criteria for diagnosis of CAA during life; identifying clinical, genetic, and neuroimaging markers for CAA severity and risk of progression; applying molecular amyloid imaging to CAA detection; characterizing the syndrome of CAA-related inflammation; and designing the foundation for the first CAA immunotherapy treatment trial (NCT01821118).  Dr. Greenberg has authored over 190 peer-reviewed research articles and over 70 chapters, reviews, and editorials in the areas of hemorrhagic stroke and small vessel brain disease, including authoritative review publications in Lancet Neurology on microbleeds (2009), microinfarcts (2012), and trial outcome markers (2014).

 

Dr. Greenberg received his undergraduate degree in Biochemistry from Harvard University and MD and PhD degrees from Columbia University under the graduate research training of Dr. James Schwartz.  He performed internship at Pennsylvania Hospital, neurology residency at MGH, and post-doctoral fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital under the training of Dr. Kenneth Kosik.